Eye surgery in Magambua

Thank you so much for praying for the eye surgery clinic we hosted this
past week! Everything went smoothly, and many people were helped and
heard about the Lord. Dr. Kirumbi and two of his nurses, Gilbert and
Mama Mtweve, assisted him in screening about 60 patients, and operating
on 21 of them. 17 surgeries were cataract, 1 was lid surgery for
trachoma, and 3 were removal of growths on the conjunctiva (for my eye
doctor friends- two were children with conjunctival cysts, and one was a
man with pterygium, both medial and lateral, on both eyes, with
encroachment on the visual axis of both eyes!)

A number of the cataract patients had been blind from cataract for more
than 3 years! One was a man who walked for 15 miles in bare feet,
following one of his grandsons. When he arrived we had to treat his
infected blisters that covered the soles of both feet while he waited
for eye surgery. Another was a woman who had been deaf and mute since
birth, and then developed cataracts and was blind for the last two
years. It was a joy to see her seeing again!
Thank you for praying and supporting these eye clinics.

We are anticipating Liz, Erin, and Radka’s arrival! We’ve heard from
all of them, Liz has arrived safely to Nairobi, Kenya, and Erin and
Radka are in northern Tanzania. We look forward to meeting them all on
the Magambua airstrip Tuesday morning.

Blessings in Christ,

Jon

The patient with the infected blisters, sitting after eye surgery.
The patient with the infected blisters, sitting after eye surgery.
Eye surgery in the bush.
Eye surgery in the bush.
The joy of seeing again! Surprised by an 'mzungu' (white person), Kim Johnson.
The joy of seeing again! Surprised by an 'mzungu' (white person), Kim Johnson.
Post-op, waiting for the bandages to come off.
Post-op, waiting for the bandages to come off.
Tape above the eye indicates the one that will get operated on.
Tape above the eye indicates the one that will get operated on.
A dense corneal scar in the right eye, inoperable in our setting.
A dense corneal scar in the right eye, inoperable in our setting.
The initial crowd.
The initial crowd.

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